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Welcome to Ma Mazda Dealer , your only destination for a new Mazda car or crossover in Massachusetts.  We also have an extensive selection of Mazda Cerified Pre Owned cars and crossovers that have at a minimum 12 month, 12,000 mile full coverage as well as 7 year, 100,000 mile power train coverage starting at the original date of service. Being a Mazda dealer, we have used Mazda vehicles that are not certified as well. Check out the all new Ma Mazda Dealer lineup below.

Mazda CX5 | Huge selection at Ma Mazda Dealer !

Mazda CX5 has taken the automotive market by storm!  Introduced in early 2012 as 2013 model, Mazda CX5 is your number one choice in the CUV segment

Mazda, the maverick, does so much with so little. The Hiroshima-based company almost singlehandedly keeps the affordable-sports-car-flame flickering with the MX-5 and, for the most part, has resisted intertwining its operations with other automakers in ways that would help growth but almost certainly blur its focus. There’s no large pickup or truck-based SUV channeling fat profits into the company coffers, covering the tab for poorly conceived, money-losing offerings elsewhere in the lineup (if Mazda had any). Small in scale compared with other mainstream brands, Mazda’s every model must stand on its own.

The CX-5 certainly does. We’ve liked its balance of utility, efficiency, and pleasant driving dynamics since the crossover’s introduction as a 2013 model. That first-year model’s power deficiency was remedied for 2014 with the addition of the 184-hp, 2.5-liter four to the CX-5’s powertrain lineup. And for 2016, the plain-yet-pleasant cabin gets upgraded interior materials and design features that wouldn’t look out of place in an Audi. The automaker has already classed up the Mazda 3 and Mazda 6with essentially the same treatment.

Home / Mazda / Mazda CX-5
Mazda CX-5

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2016 Mazda CX-5 shown
MSRP
$22,675
Listed MSRP is for a 2016 Mazda CX-5 FWD 4dr Man Sport base trim with no options. Includes destination fee. Does not include sales tax.
Change Trim
LeaseFinance
$302/mo*
This number is based on a 36-month, 15000-mile-per-year lease. Lease calculation assumes money factor of 0.00048 and residual of 54%. Assumes ZIP code of 90210 and entered credit score of 800 or higher. Does not include sales tax. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount may be determined at lease signing. Mileage charge of $0.15/mile over 45,000 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. Lease payments will vary depending on options, vehicle availability, dealer participation, lender participation and terms, and credit score, all of which may vary from the assumptions above. The payment listed is not a guarantee or offer, only an estimate. Promotional interest rate and residual used for monthly lease payment calculation valid 7/1/2016 – 9/6/2016.
Cash Due at Signing
$0 total cash due at signing includes $0 total cash down, $0 security deposit, $750 in cash rebates. Tax, title, tags, and dealership fees not included. $595 lease acquisition fee is rolled into monthly payments. Unless waived as part of offer, first month’s payment is included in due at signing amount.
*AccuPayment estimates payments under various scenarios for budgeting and informational purposes only. AccuPayment does not state credit or lease terms that are available from a creditor or lessor, and AccuPayment is not an offer or promotion of a credit or lease transaction.
4 INCENTIVES AVAILABLE
Price with Options
or Get a Quote
Browse Used Inventory
Mazda’s ethos is to blend sports-car know-how into every model, and the CX-5 is no exception. Sharp steering and a poised chassis make it the enthusiast’s pick. A 155-hp 2.0-liter four, six-speed manual, and front-wheel drive are standard; a 184-hp 2.5-liter four is optional, with six-speed auto and all-wheel drive. The smart cabin, easy-to-use infotainment, and optional safety tech—adaptive cruise, automated emergency braking, and more—underscore the CX-5’s great all-rounder standing.
Jump to Instrumented Test – 2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
24/30 mpg
EPA
7.7 sec
0-60
184 hp
HP
120 mph
Top Speed
Tested: 2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
View All Features and Specs
Rank in Compact Crossovers and SUVs
1. Mazda CX-5
Price: $22,675 – $30,770

2. Ford Escape
Price: $24,485 – $32,640

3. Honda CR-V
Price: $24,745 – $34,395

4. Hyundai Tucson
Price: $23,595 – $32,195

5. Jeep Cherokee
Price: $24,490 – $39,390

6. Kia Sportage
Price: $23,045 – $32,385

7. Jeep Wrangler
Price: $24,890 – $37,990

8. Subaru Forester
Price: $23,245 – $34,645
Show More in Compact Crossovers and SUVs (15 total)

Instrumented Test
VIEW 37 PHOTOS
2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
Updating Mazda’s fine-driving crossover was an inside job.

APR 2015 BY RON SESSIONS PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL SIMARI
SHARE
TWEET
Mazda, the maverick, does so much with so little. The Hiroshima-based company almost singlehandedly keeps the affordable-sports-car-flame flickering with the MX-5 and, for the most part, has resisted intertwining its operations with other automakers in ways that would help growth but almost certainly blur its focus. There’s no large pickup or truck-based SUV channeling fat profits into the company coffers, covering the tab for poorly conceived, money-losing offerings elsewhere in the lineup (if Mazda had any). Small in scale compared with other mainstream brands, Mazda’s every model must stand on its own.

The CX-5 certainly does. We’ve liked its balance of utility, efficiency, and pleasant driving dynamics since the crossover’s introduction as a 2013 model. That first-year model’s power deficiency was remedied for 2014 with the addition of the 184-hp, 2.5-liter four to the CX-5’s powertrain lineup. And for 2016, the plain-yet-pleasant cabin gets upgraded interior materials and design features that wouldn’t look out of place in an Audi. The automaker has already classed up the Mazda 3 and Mazda 6 with essentially the same treatment.

VIEW PHOTOS

Midcycle refreshes can be tricky. But Mazda wasn’t about to start fixin’ what ain’t broke. Aside from some new LED head-, tail-, and fog lamps available on upper trim levels and a revised five-bar shield grille, the 2016 CX-5 possesses the same design grace and poise as its predecessor.

Touch Points
We’ve already mentioned the 2016 CX-5’s updates at its Los Angeles auto show unveiling, but it’s worth repeating that most of them focus on the cabin and things that the driver and passengers interact with most. In general, the refreshed CX-5’s interior details are classier. There are nicer materials and tasteful accent trim on the dashboard and console. The armrests are more comfortable. Thoughtful touches include padding where one’s knee might rest against the side of the center console when, say, exercising our test car’s 0.81 g of lateral grip on a fun-to-drive, twisty road.

Stash space? Check. Mazda’s switch to an electric parking brake frees up real estate on the console where the conventional handbrake once lived. There are two USBs and an auxiliary jack in an easily accessible open storage bin beneath the center stack. Another console cubby is right-sized for the car’s key fob (push-button start is standard) or other small items. But the big change is the adoption of the new Mazda Connect infotainment system on all but the base model. It uses an Audi MMI–like multifunction control wheel on the console, so there’s less need to lean forward to access some of the old infotainment display’s hard buttons. The touch screen itself grows from 5.8 to 7.0 inches this year, making everything easier to read.

Our Grand Touring test car also sported supportive, comfortable, and gorgeous Parchment leather seats; a grippy leather-wrapped steering wheel; and simple, easy-to-use climate-control knobs and buttons. Now if only the volume knob were on the driver’s side of the console and the backup-camera display had dynamic trajectory lines, the setup would be just about perfect. The CX-5’s gauges are rather blah, though, and would be more engaging with higher contrast and larger, more interesting fonts. This is a tiny nit, we know.

On Skyactiv Duty

We’d like a little less engine noise, too; despite added sound insulation this year, the direct-injected 2.5-liter’s note remains a bit grainy at idle. Still, although our test vehicle’s 7.7-second zero-to-60 time shows that the 2016 CX-5 doesn’t have the beans to dust off a Ford Escape with the 2.0-liter EcoBoost turbo, the Mazda’s roster of carryover Skyactiv engine and lightweight chassis tech is more than enough to place it at the top of its class. The new CX-5 isn’t the quickest CUV in the segment, but it has the poise and agility of a sports sedan. Its ride is firm but not harsh with well-controlled body motions. The Mazda’s electrically boosted steering has just-right weighting, good on-center feel, and a natural buildup of effort in turns that feels positively (old-school) BMW-like.

Home / Mazda / Mazda CX-5
Mazda CX-5

VIEW PHOTOS

2016 Mazda CX-5 shown
MSRP
$22,675
Listed MSRP is for a 2016 Mazda CX-5 FWD 4dr Man Sport base trim with no options. Includes destination fee. Does not include sales tax.
Change Trim
LeaseFinance
$302/mo*
This number is based on a 36-month, 15000-mile-per-year lease. Lease calculation assumes money factor of 0.00048 and residual of 54%. Assumes ZIP code of 90210 and entered credit score of 800 or higher. Does not include sales tax. Option to purchase at lease end for an amount may be determined at lease signing. Mileage charge of $0.15/mile over 45,000 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. Lease payments will vary depending on options, vehicle availability, dealer participation, lender participation and terms, and credit score, all of which may vary from the assumptions above. The payment listed is not a guarantee or offer, only an estimate. Promotional interest rate and residual used for monthly lease payment calculation valid 7/1/2016 – 9/6/2016.
Cash Due at Signing
$0 total cash due at signing includes $0 total cash down, $0 security deposit, $750 in cash rebates. Tax, title, tags, and dealership fees not included. $595 lease acquisition fee is rolled into monthly payments. Unless waived as part of offer, first month’s payment is included in due at signing amount.
*AccuPayment estimates payments under various scenarios for budgeting and informational purposes only. AccuPayment does not state credit or lease terms that are available from a creditor or lessor, and AccuPayment is not an offer or promotion of a credit or lease transaction.
4 INCENTIVES AVAILABLE
Price with Options
or Get a Quote
Browse Used Inventory
Mazda’s ethos is to blend sports-car know-how into every model, and the CX-5 is no exception. Sharp steering and a poised chassis make it the enthusiast’s pick. A 155-hp 2.0-liter four, six-speed manual, and front-wheel drive are standard; a 184-hp 2.5-liter four is optional, with six-speed auto and all-wheel drive. The smart cabin, easy-to-use infotainment, and optional safety tech—adaptive cruise, automated emergency braking, and more—underscore the CX-5’s great all-rounder standing.
Jump to Instrumented Test – 2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
24/30 mpg
EPA
7.7 sec
0-60
184 hp
HP
120 mph
Top Speed
Tested: 2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
View All Features and Specs
Rank in Compact Crossovers and SUVs
1. Mazda CX-5
Price: $22,675 – $30,770

2. Ford Escape
Price: $24,485 – $32,640

3. Honda CR-V
Price: $24,745 – $34,395

4. Hyundai Tucson
Price: $23,595 – $32,195

5. Jeep Cherokee
Price: $24,490 – $39,390

6. Kia Sportage
Price: $23,045 – $32,385

7. Jeep Wrangler
Price: $24,890 – $37,990

8. Subaru Forester
Price: $23,245 – $34,645
Show More in Compact Crossovers and SUVs (15 total)

Instrumented Test
VIEW 37 PHOTOS
2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
2016 Mazda CX-5 2.5L AWD
Updating Mazda’s fine-driving crossover was an inside job.

APR 2015 BY RON SESSIONS PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL SIMARI
SHARE
TWEET
Mazda, the maverick, does so much with so little. The Hiroshima-based company almost singlehandedly keeps the affordable-sports-car-flame flickering with the MX-5 and, for the most part, has resisted intertwining its operations with other automakers in ways that would help growth but almost certainly blur its focus. There’s no large pickup or truck-based SUV channeling fat profits into the company coffers, covering the tab for poorly conceived, money-losing offerings elsewhere in the lineup (if Mazda had any). Small in scale compared with other mainstream brands, Mazda’s every model must stand on its own.

The CX-5 certainly does. We’ve liked its balance of utility, efficiency, and pleasant driving dynamics since the crossover’s introduction as a 2013 model. That first-year model’s power deficiency was remedied for 2014 with the addition of the 184-hp, 2.5-liter four to the CX-5’s powertrain lineup. And for 2016, the plain-yet-pleasant cabin gets upgraded interior materials and design features that wouldn’t look out of place in an Audi. The automaker has already classed up the Mazda 3 and Mazda 6 with essentially the same treatment.

VIEW PHOTOS

Midcycle refreshes can be tricky. But Mazda wasn’t about to start fixin’ what ain’t broke. Aside from some new LED head-, tail-, and fog lamps available on upper trim levels and a revised five-bar shield grille, the 2016 CX-5 possesses the same design grace and poise as its predecessor.

Touch Points
We’ve already mentioned the 2016 CX-5’s updates at its Los Angeles auto show unveiling, but it’s worth repeating that most of them focus on the cabin and things that the driver and passengers interact with most. In general, the refreshed CX-5’s interior details are classier. There are nicer materials and tasteful accent trim on the dashboard and console. The armrests are more comfortable. Thoughtful touches include padding where one’s knee might rest against the side of the center console when, say, exercising our test car’s 0.81 g of lateral grip on a fun-to-drive, twisty road.

Stash space? Check. Mazda’s switch to an electric parking brake frees up real estate on the console where the conventional handbrake once lived. There are two USBs and an auxiliary jack in an easily accessible open storage bin beneath the center stack. Another console cubby is right-sized for the car’s key fob (push-button start is standard) or other small items. But the big change is the adoption of the new Mazda Connect infotainment system on all but the base model. It uses an Audi MMI–like multifunction control wheel on the console, so there’s less need to lean forward to access some of the old infotainment display’s hard buttons. The touch screen itself grows from 5.8 to 7.0 inches this year, making everything easier to read.

VIEW PHOTOS

Our Grand Touring test car also sported supportive, comfortable, and gorgeous Parchment leather seats; a grippy leather-wrapped steering wheel; and simple, easy-to-use climate-control knobs and buttons. Now if only the volume knob were on the driver’s side of the console and the backup-camera display had dynamic trajectory lines, the setup would be just about perfect. The CX-5’s gauges are rather blah, though, and would be more engaging with higher contrast and larger, more interesting fonts. This is a tiny nit, we know.

On Skyactiv Duty
We’d like a little less engine noise, too; despite added sound insulation this year, the direct-injected 2.5-liter’s note remains a bit grainy at idle. Still, although our test vehicle’s 7.7-second zero-to-60 time shows that the 2016 CX-5 doesn’t have the beans to dust off a Ford Escape with the 2.0-liter EcoBoost turbo, the Mazda’s roster of carryover Skyactiv engine and lightweight chassis tech is more than enough to place it at the top of its class. The new CX-5 isn’t the quickest CUV in the segment, but it has the poise and agility of a sports sedan. Its ride is firm but not harsh with well-controlled body motions. The Mazda’s electrically boosted steering has just-right weighting, good on-center feel, and a natural buildup of effort in turns that feels positively (old-school) BMW-like.

VIEW PHOTOS

If there’s one change for 2016 that could use fine-tuning, it’s the new Sport mode setting for the drivetrain. The spread between Normal (default) and Sport drive modes is too aggressive for a family CUV, as if it were a jump from another automaker’s Eco to Sport+ settings. Using Mazda’s Sport mode results in considerably higher rpm and lower gears than expected, and it can linger way too long between 3000 and 4000 rpm at part throttle when just cruising around. On the other hand, if you’re autocrossing your CX-5 . . .

Sport mode notwithstanding, the 2016 updates don’t affect the way the CX-5 drives, but they do make us like driving it even more. And for those who want it, the CX-5 now offers a host of active safety technologies such as adaptive cruise control, collision-mitigating braking, lane-departure warning, and automatic high-beam control (all part of our $34,140 Grand Touring’s optional $1500 i-Activsense package), as well as Smart City Brake Support (low-speed automatic braking) and adaptive front lighting as part of the $1505 GT Tech package that also brings navigation and LED head-, tail-, and fog lamps and LED running lights. It’s a CUV we can more than live with—we love it.

 

Mazda CX3 at Ma Mazda Dealer

Deputy editor Dan Pund gazed out from his cubicle into the Car and Driver parking lot, considered the 2016 Mazda CX-3 for a moment, and declared, “It’s just a Pontiac Vibe.”

He was making an observation, not hurling an insult. If we weren’t living in the age of the crossover, we—you, me, and the entire driving public—would call the CX-3 a car. The most striking difference between this so-called crossover and the Mazda 3hatchback is the gray plastic cladding that traces the body’s bottom edge.

Pund’s remark points out a larger truth, as well: As crossovers shrink to these subcompact proportions, they become less SUV-like and more closely resemble cars. From our perspective—where we appreciate a low center of gravity and the commensurate benefit to handling—that isn’t a bad thing.

In fact, the CX-3 is a very, very good thing. Mazda’s mini-ute drives like a Pontiac Vibe in the same way that a Ferrari drives like a Fiat. The CX-3 steers with precision, corners with aplomb, and scoots down the road with a verve that is almost universally absent among crossovers. Toggle the Sport mode and the quick-shifting automatic transmission takes on Porsche-esque logic, downshifting as you brake for an upcoming corner. Without question, Mazda has built the driver’s car—er, crossover—in this burgeoning segment.

The CX-3’s 8.1-second amble to 60 mph qualifies as quick, but only because vehicles in this class often run in the nines and occasionally flirt with the 10-second mark. Credit for its fleetness goes to the svelte 2932-pound curb weight as much as the 146-hp engine. The 2.0-liter four-cylinder needs revs to make its power, but it grinds toward its 6800-rpm redline with noisy protest.

The humble 16-inch wheels and pedestrian tires on our mid-level Touring model produced modest performance figures at the track. The CX-3 circled the skidpad at 0.81 g with the undefeatable stability control nipping at the brakes, then posted a ho-hum 70-to-zero-mph stopping distance of 181 feet. In typical Mazda tradition, though, what the CX-3 sacrifices in cold, hard numbers it more than makes up for in driving character.

Even those who are oblivious to Mazda’s dynamic charms should find plenty to love in the CX-3. The upscale, aggressive exterior styling encases an upscale, serene interior. Our Touring test car carried a price of about $25,500 (official MSRPs have yet to be announced) and delivered a nicely tailored cabin, flawless ergonomics, and all of the technology people actually use without any extraneous fluff. We also were impressed by our average fuel economy of 28 mpg over 300 miles.

At 7.3 inches shorter in length than a Mazda 3, the CX-3’s greatest shortcoming is its shortness. The amount of space behind the front buckets is seriously compressed. Anyone planning to use the rear seats with any regularity would be better served by one of this segment’s rolling refrigerator boxes, such as the Jeep Renegade or the Kia Soul.

But if fun-to-drive tops your shopping list, you can’t find a better small crossover than the Mazda CX-3. Or you could just buy a car.

Mazda CX3

 

Mazda CX9 At Ma Mazda Dealer

We talk a big game. After endlessly professing our love for Chevy Corvettes, Porsche Caymans, and Mazda MX-5 Miatas, more often than not, when the time comes to pick a vehicle for a weekend road trip, we choose something practical. Practical is three rows. Practical is all-wheel drive. Practical is quiet. Practical rides well. Practical doesn’t make us look as if we’re suffering a mid-life crisis. And practical gets driven. In our long-term fleet, the vehicles that rack up 40,000 miles the quickest are always minivans and three-row SUVs. As much as we love driving them, sports cars can’t accommodate the family or carry much stuff.

So the Mazda CX-9 is practical, but it’s not all Costco and Home Depot and road trips to Disney. The CX-9 looks like something Karl Lagerfeld would use to run errands on whatever his version of a nice little Saturday might be.

A wholesale redo, the new CX-9 lifts the design idioms of Mazda’s own CX-5 but also borrows some styling cues from the Infiniti QX70 (the SUV formerly known as the FX). The big Mazda, especially on its optional 20-inch wheels, looks elegant enough to wear a designer badge. Some of what makes the Mazda appear expensive is actually its restraint. Yes, the large chrome grille juts menacingly forward and has LED lighting inside it, but Mazda’s designers appear to have sculpted the clay with hands when forming the CX-9, rather than hacking at it with swords. Even the Mazda’s paint looks like a budget breaker. Covered in a finely flaked hue called Machine Gray, the CX-9 glows. This SUV has the presence and style to rival Acura’sMDX and Infiniti’s QX60.

It’s the same story inside. Mazda’s material choices look and feel rich. Many of the plastics are so finely grained and soft to the touch that they appear to be bovine based. On our top-spec Signature tester, sticker price $45,215, there are open-pore rosewood trim pieces, aluminum accents, and soft brick-colored Nappa leather seats. The gaps are consistently tight, and the trim all lines up with an obsessive attention to detail.

In an effort to bring the CX-9’s noise levels upmarket, Mazda tells us it worked on suppressing the tire roar that plagued the previous CX-9. The replacement has a thicker floorpan, 53 pounds of sound deadening under the carpet, and an acoustically laminated windshield and front windows. The work pays off with a low 65 decibels of noise at 70 mph, four less than the last CX-9 we tested and the same as the Tesla Model X. Our only gripes up front are related to the seats. The driver’s chair doesn’t go low enough and needs more thigh support, and the passenger’s seat produces the same complaints while lacking any height adjustment.

As in the CX-9’s brethren, the instrument panel is dominated by round analog dials. But unlike in almost every other Mazda, one of the round gauges is actually a color LCD screen that can display trip-computer information and a compass. On all but the lowest Sport trim level, which gets a seven-inch screen, there’s an eight-inch touchscreen in the middle of the dashboard. It’s a bit too far to touch while driving, so the screen can also be controlled by the BMW iDrive–like knob behind the shifter. Navigation and audio controls are logical and easy to use with either the knob or the touchscreen.

In the second row, there’s ample space for adults, provided they slide the split bench all the way back. However, second-row legroom comes at the expense of third-row space. Unlike some competitors, Mazda doesn’t offer captain’s chairs in the second row. The split-bench second row folds forward to ease entry into the way back, but the Ford Explorer, Honda Pilot, and Toyota Highlander, with their second-row walk-throughs, make it easier. The competition also beats the CX-9’s two-person third row. The Mazda’s rearmost row is kid-friendly, but the Highlander’s and the Pilot’s work better for adults, and each can theoretically hold three. There is a 14-cubic-foot cargo hold in the Mazda, and folding its third row increases that to 38 cubic feet. With both rows folded flat, there’s 71 cubic feet of space, but the Mazda is on the smaller end of the three-row spectrum. Also, you’ll be doing the folding yourself as power-folding seats aren’t available.

And while the rest of the class offers V-6 power, the CX-9 comes with only a four-cylinder turbo. The engine displaces 2.5 liters and makes 250 horsepower on 93 octane and 227 horses on 87, says Mazda. On California’s 91-octane fuel, it makes something in between and can run zero to 60 mph in 7.2 seconds. It passes through the quarter-mile in 15.7 seconds at 88 mph. The Pilot and Explorer Sport are both quicker to 60 by about a second; the V-6–powered Highlander is about a tenth slower than the CX-9.

Mazda tells us that it studied how buyers use their three-row-mobiles and found that they almost never rev the engine past 4500 rpm. The power just above idle is more impor­tant. To provide punch where owners want it, the CX-9’s engine makes 310 pound-feet of torque at 2000 rpm, regardless of octane. That torque translates into a nice firm shove from low revs, and it gives the big CX-9 the ability to squirt into holes in traffic. The throttle response is excellent, even from idle, with boost that builds instantly, likely due to the clever Dynamic Pressure Turbo system. But if you drive the CX-9 as we do—part throttle and no redlining makes Jack a dull boy—the power tapers off noticeably. It doesn’t fall away with the abruptness of a turbo-diesel, but there’s a big drop in enthusiasm beyond 4500 rpm.

According to Mazda, using a four instead of the old 3.7-liter V-6 saves 132 pounds. Front-drive models weigh 4054, a loss of 269 pounds. We measured 4336 for our all-wheel-drive CX-9 Signature, 223 pounds less than the old CX-9. It’s between 200 and 700 pounds lighter than most of the three-row class, but the Pilot, Hyundai Santa Fe, and Kia Sorento are a few pounds lighter still.

The downsized engine and reduced mass help boost EPA fuel economy from last year’s 16 city/22 highway mpg (AWD) and 17/24 (front drive) to 21/27 and 22/28, respectively. Those numbers are good enough to take the CX-9 to the head of the class; the GMC Acadia, with the newly available naturally aspirated 194-hp 2.5-liter four and all-wheel drive, comes close at 21/25 mpg.

To boost real-world fuel economy, Mazda fits a cooling system to the exhaust-gas-recirculation system that helps reduce combustion temperatures. When on boost, a turbo causes the engine to consume more fuel, not only to match the extra air entering the engine but also as a little extra to help keep the combustion chamber cool. By cooling the exhaust that recirculates back to the engine, combustion temperatures are thus reduced without having to rely on a rich mixture.

Mazda tells us that while the system’s benefits don’t show up on the light-throttle, almost-no-boost EPA test, there will be a benefit for real drivers. We rarely drive like real people, though, so we managed only 19 mpg over nearly 500 miles.

All drivers will find the CX-9 is as smooth and charismatic as it appears. The electrically assisted power steering is light and accurate. Like all Mazdas, the CX-9 is easy to place on the road. With 20-inch wheels, the suspension tuning is on the firm side of supple. Push the CX-9 hard, and it never feels as ponderous as the minivan-like Highlander and Pilot. Switch the six-speed automatic into sport mode, and the CX-9 almost starts to think it’s an MX-5 Cup car. The gearbox snaps through downshifts under braking and gears are held longer.

We measured 0.80 g of grip in skidpad testing despite an overactive stability-control system. Even on public roads, we found the stability control a bit too intrusive. It can’t be shut off, and if you press hard into a corner, it’ll clamp down on the brakes. Should you need to slam on the brakes, stopping from 70 mph takes 179 feet, a typical distance for the class.

For the safety conscious, Mazda offers a full cache of driver-­assistance systems, including blind-spot monitoring, radar-based cruise control, and lane-departure warning and correction. Only Grand Touring and Signature models get the radar-based active cruise control that makes the collision-warning system possible. If the vehicle senses an imminent collision, it will slam on the brakes. It’s too sensitive. Three times in as many days, the system thought an accident was developing when there was no danger. It surprised us by slamming on the brakes twice while gradually slowing behind a row of cars at a red light, and once again when changing lanes to dart around a slower car. The system can be shut off and its sensitivity can be adjusted (both times when the system intervened, it was set to its least sensitive setting), but it automatically reactivates every time the engine starts. The overactive system is completely inconsistent with Mazda’s driver-centric gospel.

Annoying collision-warning system aside, the new CX-9 is the most engaging vehicle in its class, proving that practicality doesn’t always mean giving up handling and style. What it lacks in third-row space, it makes up for in refinement and dynamics. A base CX-9 starts at $32,420; add all-wheel drive for $1800. Even fully loaded to $45,215 as our test car was, the CX-9 remains a strong value in a world where a Pilot Elite costs $47,470 and an Explorer Platinum costs $53,915. It might not have the acceleration or third-row space of those two, but what’s more practical than saving money?
Ma Mazda Dealer Mazda3 Review

Many carmakers are fond of employing the term “DNA” in describing their vehicle lineups, but few have as much product justification for doing so as Mazda, and fewer still exhibit as much restraint. We hear a lot about zoom-zoom, of course, but that, too, seems justified. From top to bottom, Mazda’s offerings are uniquely uniform in terms of one key DNA trait: an engaging driving experience.

You’d expect that from the little MX-5 Miata sports car, of course. But you might not from the much bigger and more utilitarian CX-9 crossover, Mazda’s family wagon. Nevertheless, it’s there, right across the board. And it certainly distinguishes theMazda 3 from most others in the compact corral. Hatchback or sedan, the 3 tops our compact-car rankings, largely on the strength of its athleticism, although for 2016 Mazda also has ramped up the 3’s value.

For example, Mazda has trimmed the pricing for the basic 3 i Sport by $600, to $18,665, while at the same time expanding its standard feature content. Our 3 i Grand Touring test car—which essentially lacked only LED exterior lighting and real leather to be top-of-the-line—included navigation, a 7.0-inch touch-screen display, Bose nine-speaker audio, heated front seats, dual-zone automatic climate control, cruise control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, Bluetooth with text-messaging capability, Pandora, a rearview camera, a blind-spot monitor, and rear cross-traffic alert. The only option was a $70 cargo mat. By compact-class standards, it adds up to a pretty comprehensive package for less than $23,500.

2.0 vs. 2.5

Our test car was powered by the 3’s basic 2.0-liter four-cylinder. Adding about two grand will put the optional 2.5-liter four under the hood, with 184 horsepower and 185 lb-ft of torque compared with the 2.0-liter’s modest totals of 155 and 150.

Consistent with Mazda’s sporting ethos, both engines can be paired with either a six-speed manual (standard) or a six-speed automatic transmission. Our test example had the manual, with its endearingly crisp engagements enhanced by a very sweet clutch.

The zero-to-60-mph run takes 7.5 seconds. That’s not a thrill ride, and it’s just 0.1 second quicker than a 2.0-liter paired with the six-speed auto. On the other hand, it’s only a couple tenths behind a 2.5-liter manual hatchback we tested. The acceleration disparity magnifies as the drag race goes on—the 2.5 hatch reached 100 mph 2.1 seconds quicker than the 2.0 sedan. Even though that particular hatchback weighed in 120 pounds heavier than this sedan, horsepower eventually will tell. The point, though, is to decide whether a few tenths in such a test are worth the extra money.

And the further point is that, 2.0 or 2.5, acceleration isn’t the 3’s primary appeal. It will hold its own in the daily-commute derby, but where this car comes into its own is on a two-lane back road with a variety of turns and a paucity of traffic. Chassis rigidity is on par with a bridge girder, body motions are modest, the car responds to inputs with immediacy, and the electric power steering is quick (2.6 turns lock-to-lock), informative, and dead-bang accurate. Attention steering engineers worldwide: Check out this system, learn, adopt.

Is there understeer? Sure, and you’d expect that in a front-drive car. But it’s modest. Grip—0.86 g on our skidpad—is better than modest, even with a set of relatively high-profile all-season Bridgestone Ecopias (205/60-16). Braking performance could be a little better, and on the test track we noted hints of fade. However, fade wasn’t an issue in our real-world exercises, the pedal is easy to modulate, and tires less focused on fuel economy undoubtedly would improve stopping distances.

Speaking of, fuel economy is rated at 29 mpg city and 41 highway by the EPA. Once again, we underachieved, logging 29 mpg on suburban and rural roads. Summoning haste from the 2.0-liter engine doesn’t do much for fuel economy

The interior of our test car will look okay at a glance—provided the beholder is partial to black. Although there are little licks of silvery material here and there, the overall impression is midnight at the oasis. A few small, carbon-fiber-look trim panels don’t do a lot to relieve the darkness.

The front seats provide adequate lateral support, but the bottom cushions feel a little thin. And making adults happy in the rear seat will require territorial concessions by those up front.

Assessed as eye candy, the Mazda 3 sedan has a family look, with attractive sculpting in the side sheetmetal, enhanced by a snappy set of 16-inch aluminum wheels. We still prefer the more athletic looks of the hatchback version, but the sedan isn’t a wallflower, either.

Leaving dynamics out of the equation, the Mazda 3 stacks up as a modestly attractive compact sedan with good fuel economy and a solid value story. But dynamics are this car’s strong suit—and the prime reason we see the 3 as tops in its class.

As the age of the autonomous automobile draws ever nearer, Mazda continues to be guided by the premise that operating a motor vehicle should be both involving and gratifying. The new corporate mantra sums it up: Driving matters. Long may it last.

Ma  Mazda Dealer Mazda6 Inventory

A 10Best Cars and comparison-test winner, the Mazda 6 is our pick of the current mid-size sedan litter. It’s a solidly built, well-executed, and fun-to-drive vehicle that delivers a level of satisfaction well beyond what’s expected in a family sedan. The car recently was refreshed for 2016, and while Mazda wisely kept the updates to a minimum, the 6 is nonetheless even more enjoyable. Plus, thankfully, Mazda didn’t axe the sweet six-speed manual transmission installed in our subject for this review.

Inner Peace

We previously evaluated the Mazda’s midcycle changes in a test of an automatic-only 2016 Grand Touring model. Although the various nips and tucks made to the shapely body are barely noticeable, the changes inside are significant. A resculpted dash with a slimmer center stack and console brings the 6’s cabin in line with other Mazdas, such as the compact Mazda 3 and the CX-5 crossover, as does the seven-inch, tabletlike color screen mounted high on the dash. The functions on the display can be operated both via touch and by using Mazda’s central control knob that sits neatly on the console next to the new electronic parking brake.

The overall aesthetic is more contemporary and easier on the eyes than before, and it comes with the added benefit of improved usability. Even in the mid-grade Touring model—the toniest version offered with the stick shift—the 6 feels a cut above its competitors in terms of interior haptics and fit and finish. Although the GT exceeds 30 grand, the manual Sport version starts at $22,315 and the manual Touring at $24,765. (Mazda’s six-speed automatic costs an additional $1050 or $1500, depending on trim level.) The manual Touring version we drove for this review stickered at $25,265 with a few minor extras; standard equipment included 19-inch wheels with all-season rubber, proximity key, sport seats with leatherette upholstery, dual-zone automatic climate control, blind-spot and rear-cross-traffic alerts, and more.

A Willing Playmate

The highlight here, though, is the manual gearbox, which lends the 6 an extra sense of playfulness with its well-placed pedals and excellent shifter. Heel-and-toe downshifts are encouraged, and the 6 definitely emerged from the same gene pool as the MX-5 Miata. Regardless of transmission, all 6s pack the same Skyactiv 2.5-liter four-cylinder producing 184 horsepower and 185 lb-ft of torque, which is merely adequate in terms of output. At least it allows the manual 6 a respectable EPA city/highway rating of 25/37 mpg.

We weren’t able to test this particular Touring model, but a handy set of scales revealed it to be 170 pounds lighter than the 2016 GT with the automatic and roughly 70 pounds heavier than the last manual car we evaluated, a 2014 Sport. That Mazda reached 60 mph in 7.9 seconds and covered the quarter-mile in 16.1 at 90 mph. It also could stop from 70 mph in 172 feet and stuck to the skidpad with a respectable 0.87 g of lateral grip. Expect those numbers to basically hold for this newer version.

While the stick offers the extra measure of driver involvement we cherish, even with the automatic, the 6 is still fun and has the same high-quality cabin. Mazda smartly programmed the six-speed automatic to be both efficient in casual driving and engaging on a back road with its Sport setting activated. There’s basically no way to go wrong with the 6, which is exactly why we keep giving it awards.

Ma Mazda Dealer MX5 Miata Review

here’s comfort in the latest Miata—sorry, MX-5 Miata. It’s not the comfort of plush leather seats, a soft ride, or opera windows. It’s the comfort of knowing that even in its fourth generation, Mazda’s two-seat roadster steadfastly remains a Miata.

The MX-5 is sui generis partly because of its size and the toylike character that size confers. As the world around it grows—cars are bigger, mediums are larger, waistlines are rounder, SUVs still exist—the defiant Miata retains roughly the same dimensions of the 1990 original. What did you look like a quarter-century ago?

More impressive, the new MX-5 has actually slimmed down a bit from the previous, third-generation car. It has a shorter wheelbase and is nearly a half-inch lower.

But if the car looks and feels trim, it seems bigger inside. Cabin space is better conceived and allotted than before, the seat reclines farther, and there’s a tad more headroom. The steering wheel tilts but doesn’t telescope, the sills are slightly higher, and the seats are lower by nearly an inch. In the last Miata, a high seat and low doors gave the driver the impression that he was on top of the car instead of in it.

Despite the deeper seating position, forward visibility is excellent. The hood is more than an inch lower than before—thanks to an engine set half an inch farther back and a lower-profile oil pan that brings the engine down by half an inch—while tall fender creases make the car easy to place on the road. Revving under our right-hand-drive test car’s plunging hoodline is a 1.5-liter four-cylinder direct-injection gasoline engine that will be standard in the rest of the world. The little four makes 129 horsepower at 7000 rpm and 111 lb-ft of torque at 4800 rpm. Willing and happy to rev to its 7500-rpm redline, the 1.5-liter builds power steadily and never emits a coarse tone. Great shifters are a Miata tradition, one that continues here: A six-speed with delightfully short throws is seemingly drawn into each cog. First gear is good for 36 mph, second redlines at 61 mph, and third goes to 88 mph (per our observations of the speedometer, at least). With the 1.5-liter engine, we estimate a zero-to-60-mph run takes just over seven seconds.

The U.S. version is likely to be a bit quicker. We’ll be skipping the turbine-smooth 1.5-liter engine in favor of a 2.0-liter version similar to the one in the CX-5. Adapted for the MX-5’s longitudinal orientation, the 2.0-liter will get a different intake manifold, exhaust system, and cylinder head. Mazda is as tight-lipped as the NSA when it comes to the 2.0-liter, but we at least got officials to divulge that it will have 155 horsepower and 148 lb-ft of torque when the American Miata arrives this summer. (The specification panel for this story covers the 2.0-liter, U.S.-spec version of the car.)

The 1.5-liter cars we drove in Spain were equipped with 16-inch wheels wearing 195/50R-16 Yokohama Advan Sport V105 tires. Thus equipped, grip is excellent and the tires don’t squeal, no matter how hard you pound their little faces into the asphalt. And when the grip goes, the MX-5 slides steadily and is easy to catch thanks in part to its low mass. The highly boosted steering is quick and rewards a light touch, all of which adds to an impression of extreme smallness.

Mazda engineers tell us that they’ve purposely built a bit of initial compliance into the suspension to give the driver an awareness of load transfer during cornering. What that means: When you turn the wheel, the body squirms slightly before taking a set. Eliminating the squirm would make the car tighter, more precise, and more responsive to steering inputs. We’d like to see such a tweak for the—fingers crossed—Mazdaspeed version.

The U.S. car will arrive with 17-inch wheels and 205/45R-17 tires. Maybe the plus-sizing is necessary because 16s are the new 13s, or maybe it’s because our MX-5 will get slightly larger brakes that won’t fit inside the 16-inch wheels. That wider rubber will be working through a control-arm front suspension and a multilink rear suspension.

Weight is a claimed 2200 pounds for the 1.5-liter car, but there’s no news on the mass front for the American-spec version. Historical note: The 1990 Miata we testedwith optional A/C and power steering weighed 2210 pounds. To keep off the fat in the new car, Mazda uses aluminum more extensively than before in the chassis. The previous Miata had an aluminum hood, trunklid, center frame brace, and suspension arms. In addition to those lightweight pieces, the new MX-5 uses aluminum for the front fenders, front knuckles, convertible-top supports, rear bulkhead and roll hoops, and front and rear bumper supports. The center of gravity drops by nearly a quarter-inch. We’re going to predict that our U.S. version will weigh in at less than 2400 pounds. (These weight-saving measures should carry over to the Fiat version of this car, which Mazda will assemble in Hiroshima alongside the MX-5, as well as the recently unveiled Cup racing version.)

Since the Miata’s arrival 26 years ago, sports cars have slowly grown into giants. Bigger cars may have bigger engines, they may carry passengers more comfortably, and they might sell better in China (and everywhere else for that matter), but it’s gratifying to know that the Miata continues to stay true to the original, which itself stayed true to the Lotus Elan. It’s still a small sports car. It’s still big fun. It’s still a toy. Best of all, it still makes us happy.

Ma Mazda Dealer | Mazda Certified Pre Owned

Overview

Mazda offers a generous certified pre-owned (CPO) warranty with two components. There’s a 1-year or 12,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty that starts from the day you buy your certified vehicle (or the day the original warranty runs out), along with a 7-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty from the original sale date. Mazda’s warranty also boasts no deductible, and it’s fully transferable to the next owner.

What We Like

Full transferability; long powertrain coverage; no deductible; additional bumper-to-bumper warranty

What We Don’t

Powertrain warranty starts from original sale date; bumper-to-bumper coverage is nice but average

Program Specifics

Mazda offers an excellent certified pre-owned warranty program that checks nearly all our boxes. There’s a good warranty, full transferability, no deductible and several other enticing benefits.

The most important benefit offered by Mazda’s CPO program is the warranty. Although we don’t love that it starts on the original sale date (which can be confusing to someone who buys the car used), it offers an excellent 7 years or 100,000 miles of powertrain protection. That’s not bad for a CPO warranty. The program also touts a 1-year or 12,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty, which starts as soon as the original bumper-to-bumper warranty ends. If there’s no bumper-to-bumper warranty left, it instead begins on the day you buy your certified pre-owned car.

Mazda’s program offers a few other alluring benefits. There’s no deductible for repairs, which means you won’t have to pay a penny if your car breaks down and you need to fix it. The warranty is fully transferable to the next owner, which may enhance your resale value if you decide to sell before the warranty expires. And Mazda occasionally offers special financing rates on CPO cars, which means that certified Mazda models often tout more attractive deals than traditional used cars.

We’re impressed with Mazda’s certified pre-owned plan, and we suggest you consider a CPO Mazda if you’re interested in one of the brand’s used cars.

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